Fall 2019 Graduate Course Offerings

INTRO TO GRADUATE STUDIES IN HUMAN COMMUNICATION

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. SHARON JARVIS
CMS 081
FRIDAYS 3-4:30 pm in BMC 4.206
CLASS SIZE = 15
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is required for all first-year graduate students in Communication Studies and intended to introduce new students to their cohort, other graduate students, the faculty, the department, the college and university, and the field.  In addition, incoming graduate students are socialized to professional expectations and issues associated with the department and careers in the university life.
 
TEXTBOOKS:
None.
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Restricted to first-year Communication Studies graduate students.
 

QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. TALIA STROUD
CMS 386N 
TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS 9:30-11 am in CMA 3.116
CLASS SIZE = 12
 
 
DESCRIPTION:
Quantitative Research Methods is a course designed to acquaint you with some of the basic issues, analytic techniques, and "ways of thinking" associated with social scientific approaches to communication research. More specifically, we will be examining various research paradigms, common methods of data collection, and several statistical techniques used to test empirical questions.
 
TEXTBOOK:
TBD
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Restricted to CMS graduate students.
 

NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. RENÉ DAILEY
CMS 386P.1
WEDNESDAYS 3:30—6:30  in CMA 7.120
CLASS SIZE = 12
 
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed to provide an overview of the theories and major research areas related to nonverbal communication in interpersonal relationships. Specifically, the course will cover a brief review of nonverbal channels, methods used in nonverbal research, the role of nonverbal behaviors in various communication goals (e.g., impression management, dominance, deception, communicating emotions), and patterns such as adaptation, reciprocity, and compensation. Students will read foundational as well as recent research, present a summary of a theory used in nonverbal research, engage in coding projects, and create a research proposal related to nonverbal communication.
 
TEXTBOOKS:
Manusov, V., & Patterson, M .L. (Eds.) (2006). The Sage handbook of nonverbal communication. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Hardcover ISBN: 9781412904049.
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all Communication Studies graduate students and with instructor approval, other University of Texas graduate students.
 

 


INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION THEORY

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. ERIN DONOVAN
CMS 386K
TUESDAYS 3:30-6:30 PM in CMA 7.120
CLASS SIZE = 12
 
 
DESCRIPTION:
This survey course provides an overview of theories and research relevant to verbal and nonverbal communication in interpersonal relationships.
 
TEXTBOOK:
Knapp, M. L., & Daly, J. A. (Eds.). (2011). The SAGE handbook of interpersonal communication. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.  ISBN-10: 1412974747 | ISBN-13: 978-1412974745
 
Additional reading packet
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all Communication Studies graduate students and with instructor approval, other University of Texas graduate students
 

COMMUNICATING IN GROUPS AND TEAMS

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. DAWNA BALLARD
CMS 386L.3
MONDAYS 3:30– 6:30 PM in CMA 7.120
CLASS SIZE = 12
 
DESCRIPTION:

This course offers a broad overview of the major concepts and theories of group and intergroup communication processes.  This includes a comparative examination of “top-down” models developed in traditionally studied contexts alongside newer “bottom-up” models that address the unique (inter)group dynamics found in less formal settings.  The course is organized around a series of fundamental issues and topical concerns across small groups, identity-based groups, teams, and communities.  By the completion of the course, students should: 1) have a more nuanced and sophisticated understanding of the major issues and concepts concerning communication in and between groups, teams, and communities of practice across a variety of contexts; and, 2) be able to apply this knowledge in a range of scholarly and practice-oriented settings.  Students are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the readings in terms of their content and any perceived weaknesses.

TEXTBOOK:
Hollingshead, A. B., & Poole, M. S. (Eds.) (2012). Research methods for studying groups and teams: A guide to approaches, tools, and technologies.
 
Poole, M. S., & Hollingshead, A. B. (Eds.) (2005). Theories of small groups: Interdisciplinary perspectives.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
 
Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning, and identity: New York: Cambridge University Press.
 
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all Communication Studies graduate students and with instructor approval, other University of Texas graduate students
 

COMMUNICATION, POWER, AND INEQUALTIY

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. SHIV GANESH
CMS 390S
TUESDAYS 6:30-9:30 PM in CMA 7.120
CLASS SIZE = 15
 
DESCRIPTION:
The concept of power has been a formative category in social theory over the last several hundred years, and it is a prime vector in how we understand inequality, a central issue of our times. We use the term to explain issues in subjects as diverse as government, religion, globalization, popular culture, gender, sexuality, management and organizational behavior, technology, and personal relationships. Such range and importance shape the objectives of this course, as follows.
 
First, given that one can find a treatment of power in the work of most prominent social theorists (in many ways the history of the study of power is the history of social theory itself), it becomes important to consider this history. Moreover, debates about power and control that have occurred over the last two hundred years have significantly influenced communication inquiry and, as students of communication, we need to better understand such influence. Given this heavy ideological baggage, an important objective of the seminar is to learn the history of the concept of power itself.
 
Second, the concern with power and politics in communication studies has been a central concern of what might loosely be called ‘the critical tradition’ in several key areas of communication inquiry. Another prime objective of this seminar is to provide its participants with a broad-based understanding of possibilities for critical communication studies of inequality. We spend the first several class meetings examining key classical and modern theorists of power, including Machiavelli, Marx, Weber, Gramsci and Foucault, comparing their ideas with the work of more contemporary scholars in communication studies. We will then move into the contemporary theme of organized inequality, and take up several recent critical, journalistic, and theoretical treatments of the subject inside and outside the field of communication studies.
 
Seminar participants will read several books throughout the course of the semester, and these will be complemented with a series of other readings, some of which will be mandatory; others will be assigned to individual students to broaden the scope of seminar discussions and align course content with graduate student interests. Students will complete three kinds of assessment during the course of the semester: a set of critical précis (20%), a book review (30%), and a seminar paper (50%).
 
TEXTBOOK:
  1. Lemert, Charles (2018). Social Theory: The Multicultural, Global and Classic Readings (6th Ed). New York: Routledge.
  2. Castells, Manuel (2009). Communication Power. Oxford: Oxford UP.
  3. Sassen, Saskia (2014). Expulsions: Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy. Cambridge, MA: Belknapp press.
  4. Zuboff, Shoshana (2018). The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power. New York: PublicAffairs.
  5. Eubanks,Virginia. (2018). Automating Inequality: How high tech tools profile, police and punish the poor. New York: St. Martin’s Press.
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all Communication Studies graduate students and with instructor approval, other University of Texas graduate students.
 

SUPERVISED TEACHING IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. DINA INMAN-RAMGOLAM
CMS 398T
MONDAYS 6:30-9:30 PM in CMA 6.152
CLASS SIZE = 15
 
DESCRIPTION:

This course provides a space for teachers of communication to develop philosophies and approaches to teaching by reflecting on both the practice and theory of communication pedagogy. Rather than an in-depth study of particular communication pedagogies or training students as teachers for a particular course, this seminar offers a survey of the basic tools common to teaching in the humanities, as well as a cursory examination of some of the most common pedagogical theories used in communication studies.

Throughout this course, we will produce critical and reflective understandings of the practices and discourses of communication education while directly wedding that reflective understanding to our actions in our classrooms. In so doing, we will develop philosophies of communication education that can be expressed as theoretical models of pedagogy and can be demonstrated in specific pedagogical activity.  

 
TEXTBOOK:
TBD
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Restricted to Communication Studies graduate students.
 

BASIC RHETORICAL CRITICISM

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. MICHAEL BUTTERWORTH
CMS 390R.1
THURSDAYS  3:30-6:30 PM in CMA 7.120
Class Size:  12
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course conceives of rhetorical criticism as an attitude toward critique.  To this end, rhetorical criticism is not a “method” in the traditional sense.  Rather, it is a way of engaging cultural, political, and social issues through the lens of rhetoric.  Students will be introduced to a range of methodological approaches and objects of study, but rhetoric’s constitutive capacity will be privileged over its instrumental capacity.  Course readings will feature approaches to rhetoric that value contingency, invention, and judgment, with the aim of producing rhetorical criticism that is politically engaged, ethically responsible, and invested in rhetoric as a means of cultural production.
 
 
TEXTBOOK:
TBD
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all Communication Studies graduate students and with instructor approval, other University of Texas graduate students.