Fall 2018 Graduate Course Descriptions

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION THEORY

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. MATT MCGLONE
CMS 386K.1
MONDAYS 3:30-6:30  in CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
This survey course provides an overview of theories and research relevant to verbal and nonverbal communication in interpersonal relationships.
 
TEXTBOOK:
Knapp, M.L., & Daly, J.A. (Eds.) (2011). The Sage handbook of interpersonal communication (4th Ed.).  Thousand Oaks, CA:  Sage. 
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Course is restricted to Communication Studies graduate students
 

QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. ANITA VANGELISTI
CMS 386N.1
TUESDAYS  3:30-6:30 pm in CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
Research in Communication Studies is a course designed to acquaint you with some of the basic issues, analytic techniques, and "ways of thinking" associated with quantitative approaches to communication research. More specifically, we will be examining various research paradigms, common methods of data collection, and several statistical techniques used to test empirical questions. The goal of the course is to provide you with an introduction to quantitative methods—both in an abstract sense (via readings and class discussions) and in a more concrete, "hands-on" way (by designing your own research project and working with a statistics program).
 
TEXTBOOK:
Babbie, E. R. (2016). The practice of social research (14th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Course is restricted to Communication Studies majors.
 

STRESS AND COPING

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. ERIN DONOVAN
CMS 386P.10
THURSDAYS 3:30-6:30 in CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
In this course, we will explore how people interact with each other and with their environments during times of change and stress—including the emotions, cognitions, and behaviors that occur when people talk about upsetting or traumatic events and circumstances. We will examine some leading theoretical models of stress and coping and social support and review classic and recent empirical pieces. Processes covered will include individual-level coping (e.g., emotion-focused vs. problem-focused, approach vs. avoidant); communal coping (aka dyadic or relational coping); cybercoping; and supportive communication. An emphasis will be placed on health stressors (e.g., diagnosis of serious illness) and health-related outcomes of coping and support (e.g., depression and anxiety).
 
REQUIRED TEXTS:
American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.
 
Goldsmith, D. J. (2004). Communicating social support. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
 
Reading packet
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all University of Texas graduate students.
 

POLITICS, MEDIA, AND THE INDIVIDUAL

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. TALIA STROUD
CMS 390N.5
WEDNESDAYS 3:30-6:30 PM CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course will cover current research and theory in the area of media and politics with particular emphasis on individual-level effects. We will explore questions such as:  How does political news coverage influence how people think about politics?  What is the political impact of our changing media environment?  How does entertainment programming influence our political beliefs?  What decisions do people make about where to gather political information?  How do the media inform or fail to inform us about politics?
 
TEXTBOOK:
Several books will be required in addition to scholarly articles.  These will be announced closer to the fall semester so that new books can be included as part of the course.
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all University of Texas graduate students.
 

 


FOUNDATIONS OF RHETORICAL THEORY

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. SCOTT STROUD
CMS 390P.5
THURSDAYS 3:30 – 6:30 PM in CMA 6.146
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course explores the intellectual background to the study of rhetoric and persuasive communication. By examining the important figures in our tradition and how they define rhetoric and its relation to knowledge and ethics, this course will enhance one’s ability to address rhetorical and communication content in many of the courses that one may be asked to teach, including rhetorical theory, public speaking, persuasion, and rhetorical criticism. It also will add a historical scope to the theories and approaches one may use in their contemporary research into rhetorical and communicative phenomena.
 
This course represents a theoretical-historical review of writings about rhetoric in the Western tradition up to the Enlightenment. It covers many topics of vital interest to the contemporary practice and study of rhetoric, public address, persuasion, and criticism. Each writer’s way of situating rhetoric in a world of texts and action will be interrogated as a way of understanding human experience in general.  The course will cover important figures in the history of rhetoric, including Plato, the sophists, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintilian, Augustine, Christine de Pizan, Vico, and the ever-maligned Kant. 
 
Students will be encouraged to write a paper suitable for conference presentation that fits one of these paths: (1) a paper that appropriates concepts or concerns from a historical figure in rhetoric in studying a phenomenon or practice of the student’s current research interests in communication/rhetoric, or (2) a paper that engages a topic in the history of rhetoric proper. 
 
TEXTBOOK:
The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present, Patricia Bizzell & Bruce Herzberg, Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000, ISBN-10: 0312148399.
 
The Rhetoric and the Poetics of Aristotle, McGraw-Hill Companies, 1984, ISBN-10: 0075546027.
 
Course Reader (available at Jenn’s Copies).
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all University of Texas graduate students.
 

On Time

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. DAWNA BALLARD
CMS 390S
MONDAYS 3:30-6:30 pm in CMA 6.152
 
DESCRIPTION:
This seminar is an interdisciplinary (and transdisciplinary) exploration of one of the most central dimensions of human experience:  Time.  It is designed both for students interested in concepts that reflect underlying issues of time and temporality (for instance, involving social, behavioral, and biological processes, framed within historical and/or contemporary contexts, resultant from cultural norms and institutions, etc.) as well as for students interested in concepts that also reflect surface issues of time and temporality (for instance, new communication technologies and anytime/anywhere communication, speed, busyness, the Slow Movement, crisis communication, mindfulness, flow, multi-tasking, communication overload, “work-life” issues, lifespan issues, and 24-hour news cycles, etc.).  As part of the class, students will engage a particular area of communication, or related, research and consider how it might be better informed through (re)considering its relationship to time.  Additionally, the process of theory-building (itself a temporal issue) will be explored in detail offering students some grounding in the long-term process of theory construction and refinement.
 
TEXTBOOKS:
Required texts: Course packet from Jenn’s Copy & Binding at 2518 Guadalupe Street.
 
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition [Paperback] by Thomas S. Kuhn (2012).  ISBN-13: 860-1300156835.
 
Optional text: Great Minds in Management: The Process of Theory Development [eTextbook or Paperback] by Ken G. Smith & Michael A. Hitt (Eds.).  ISBN-13: 978-0199276820.
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Restricted to CMS graduate students.
 

ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION: MACRO

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. JOSH BARBOUR
CMS 390T.2
WEDNESDAYS 3:30-6:30 PM CMA 6.152
 
DESCRIPTION:
The course will explore theory and research related to macro-level organizational communication phenomena and the expression of macro-level forces in organizational microprocesses (i.e., macromorphic). Topics include organizational rhetoric, interorganizational relationships, diffusion of organizational innovations, and institutional theory of organizational communication (e.g., institutional messages, institutional work, institutional entrepreneurship). The course will consist of three subsections: interorganizational communication, macromorphic organizational communication, and the organization as the producer of communication. 
 
For additional details about the course, please consult:  http://www.macromorphic.com/teaching
 
TEXTBOOK:
Readings will consist of 4-5 articles and book chapters, which will be made available via Canvas. There is no textbook for the course.
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Limited enrollment for non-Communication Studies graduate students. 
 

SUPERVISED TEACHING IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. DINA INMAN-RAMGOLAM
CMS 398T
MONDAYS 6:30-9:30 PM IN CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
A student who participates in this course will gain competency in the following areas:
  • APPLIED LEARNING THEORY: Design learning experiences according to cognitive, affective, motivational, social, and environmental factors that impact learning.
  • COURSE DESIGN: Develop and communicate learning goals and expectations that are appropriate for the learning context, and align instructional activities and assessments with those goals.  
  • LEARNING ASSESSMENT: Develop a range of methods to assess students’ learning that align with learning goals to provide formative feedback and summative evidence of learning.
  • INCLUSIVE TEACHING: Analyze teaching methods that address the needs and experiences of diverse learners, and integrate those methods into your own teaching practice.
  • DISCIPLINARY PEDAGOGY: Design learning experiences appropriate for your disciplinary content and context.
  • REFLECTIVE PRACTICE: Assess and improve your own teaching through reflection, practice, and feedback from a community of teaching scholars; and reflect on, refine, and articulate your beliefs about teaching and learning and your emerging identity as teachers.
TEXTBOOK:
Nilson, Linda B. (2016). Teaching at its best: A research based resource for college instructors, 4rdedition. San Francisco: Jossey-­‐Bass.
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Required for all first-year CMS graduate students with a funded appointment.