Fall 2017

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION THEORY

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. RENE DAILEY
CMS 386K
Tuesdays 3:30- 6:30 pm in CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
This survey course provides an overview of theories and research relevant to verbal and nonverbal communication in interpersonal relationships including topics such as conflict, influence, social support, and communication skills. The major objectives of this course include: becoming familiar with foundational theories and topics as well as current trends in interpersonal communication research; synthesizing information regarding interpersonal theories and research; and critiquing interpersonal theories and research.
 
TEXTBOOK:
Knapp, M. L., & Daly, J. A. (Eds.). (2011). The SAGE handbook of interpersonal communication. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
ISBN-10: 1412974747 | ISBN-13: 978-1412974745
Additional reading packet
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Restricted to CMS graduate students.
 

MANAGING HEALTH INFORMATION

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. ERIN DONOVAN
CMS 386H
Thursdays 3:30-6:30 pm in CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
The purpose of this course is for students to become familiar with research and theories that examine why and how people exchange, conceal, and otherwise interact with health-related information. We will explore the antecedents, processes, and outcomes of communicating about matters of health and illness, with a focus on implications for personal well-being, relational quality, and public health. An emphasis will be placed on contemporary scholarship from communication and allied fields that addresses disclosure, avoidance, information behavior, and uncertainty management in personal relationships and in health care settings. This course is appropriate for students from all areas with interests in interpersonal, relational, and/or health communication.
 
REQUIRED TEXTS:
Course packet from Jenn’s copies
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all University of Texas graduate students.
 

QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. TALIA STROUD
CMS 386N
Tuesdays and Thursdays 11-12:30 in CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
Quantitative Research Methods is a course designed to acquaint you with some of the basic issues, analytic techniques, and "ways of thinking" associated with social scientific approaches to communication research. More specifically, we will be examining various research paradigms, common methods of data collection, and several statistical techniques used to test empirical questions.
 
TEXTBOOK:
TBD
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Restricted to CMS graduate students.
 

LANGUAGE, PERSUASION AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. MATT MCGLONE
CMS 386P
Tuesdays 6:30-9:30 pm in CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
All animals communicate, but humans do so with unparalleled precision, flexibility, and creativity.  These strengths derive largely from humans’ unique ability to use language.  This course focuses on how people employ and exploit linguistic precision, flexibility, and creativity in the service of influencing the beliefs and attitudes of others.  Topics include agency and intensity in language, euphemism and dysphemism, figurative expression, language attitudes, and linguistic intergroup bias. 
 
TEXTBOOK:
Reading packet
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all University of Texas graduate students.
 

ANALYZING EMBODIED COMMUNICATION

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. JURGEN STREECK
CMS 390M
Tuesdays 3:30-6:30 pm in CMA 6.152
 
DESCRIPTION:
The course is about the body’s participation in interaction and communication: how modalities such as gaze, gait, gesture, etc. are recruited, and coordinated with each other and with speech, to bring about meaningful courses of action and intersubjective understanding. In class and in their research projects students investigate the components, practices, and organization of “multimodal interaction” in videotapes of complex real-life settings where people engage in joint action and cognition. A particular focus of the class is on gesture. Exploring the communicative work of the body, we come to terms with important concepts such as “embodiment”, “embodied meaning”, “living body”, and “agency”. A main objective of the course is to give students competence in the qualitative, video-based analysis of embodied communication.
 

TEXTBOOK:

Streeck, J. Gesturecraft. The Manu-Facture of Meaning. Amsterdam 2009.
Reading packet on Canvas
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all University of Texas graduate students.
 

PRAGMATISM AND RHETORIC

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. SCOTT STROUD
CMS 390P
Mondays 3:30-6:30 in CMA 6.152
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course examines what pragmatism—as both a tradition of American thought and as a general method of inquiry—has to offer those engaged in the study of rhetoric and communication. The classical pragmatists praised communication and community, and emphasized social criticism, the importance of social science to society, and the value of culture. We will examine the thought of pragmatist thinkers to determine what pragmatism means for theories of rhetoric and communication, ideal senses of community, the art of rhetoric, the nature of criticism, as well as for the methods employed in the study of communication. The thought of Charles S. Peirce, William James, and John Dewey will assume a particular prominence. We will also look at contemporary pragmatists (such as Richard Rorty and Stanley Fish) to see how they engage the ideas of rhetoric, criticism, and communication. Students are encouraged to link pragmatism to their particular research interests, rhetorical artifacts, or methods of study in the course’s culminating research paper.
 
TEXTBOOKS:
The Writings of William James: A Comprehensive Edition, University of Chicago Press (1978), ISBN: 0226391884
The Essential Dewey, Volume 1: Pragmatism, Education, Democracy, Indiana University Press (1998), ISBN: 0253211840
The Essential Dewey, Volume 2: Ethics, Logic, Psychology, Indiana University Press (1998), ISBN: 0253211859
Art as Experience, John Dewey, Perigee Trade (2005), ISBN: 0399531971
The Public & Its Problems, John Dewey, Swallow Press (1954), ISBN: 0804002541
Experience and Nature, John Dewey, Dover Publications (2000), ISBN: 0486204715
Course reader (available at Jenn’s)
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Open to all University of Texas graduate students.
 

BASIC RHETORICAL CRITICISM

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. JOSH GUNN
CMS 390R
Thursdays 3:30 – 6:30 PM CMA 6.152
 
DESCRIPTION:
Consideration of various methods of analyzing public discourse, including how and why rhetorical analysis is attempted and what can be done with the results
 
TEXTBOOK:
Two large reading packets and books TBA
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Restricted to CMS graduate students.
 

COMMUNICATING KNOWLEDGE

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. JEFF TREEM
CMS 390S
WEDNESDAY 3:30-6:30 PM in CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course covers a broad range of theoretical approaches and empirical research related to the communication of knowledge – including questions related to expressing, sharing, evaluating, and identifying knowledge. Though part of the course will examine the study of knowledge in organizations, we will also explore broader processes of organizing among individuals, group interactions, and rhetorical aspects of communicating knowledge. Topics will include: communities of practice, knowledge management, transactive memory, expertise, and ICT use.
 
TEXTBOOK:
Weekly class readings will be available online
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Limited enrollment for non-Communication Studies graduate students. 

SUPERVISED TEACHING IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES

INSTRUCTOR:  DR. DINA INMAN

CMS 398T
MONDAYS 6:30-9:30 PM in CMA 7.120
 
DESCRIPTION:
This course provides a space for teachers of communication to develop philosophies and approaches to teaching by reflecting on both the practice and theory of communication pedagogy. Rather than an in-depth study of particular communication pedagogies or training students as teachers for a particular course, this seminar offers a survey of the basic tools common to teaching in the humanities, as well as a cursory examination of some of the most common pedagogical theories used in communication studies.
 
Throughout this course, we will produce critical and reflective understandings of the practices and discourses of communication education while directly wedding that reflective understanding to our actions in our classrooms. In so doing, we shall develop philosophies of communication education that both can be expressed as theoretical models of pedagogy and can be demonstrated in specific pedagogical activity. 
 
TEXTBOOK:
TBD
 
PREREQUISITES/RULES:
Restricted to Communication Studies graduate students.